LGBTQIA, Memoirs

Raising Ryland: Our Story of Parenting a Transgender Child With No Strings Attached by Hillary Wittington

Ages 16+

ryland

In the early years of Ryland’s life, Hillary and Jeff Wittington had to accept the fact that their daughter was deaf and would have to learn sign language in order to communicate with others. Once they got a handle on how to help Ryland acclimate to what would be her daily life, Hillary realized that Ryland wasn’t only different because she was deaf, but also because she was transgender. They knew it wouldn’t be easy because people aren’t always accepting of people who don’t fit “the norm,” but they did know that they would be supportive of their transgender child in the difficult journey.

LGBTQIA, Romance, YA Fiction

We Are the Ants by Shaun David Hutchinson

Grades 9-12

we are the ants.jpg

Henry Denton is going through a lot. His brother is a college dropout whose girlfriend is pregnant, his grandmother is slowly succumbing to Alzheimer’s, his boyfriend committed suicide last year, and his mother is struggling to keep everything together. in addition, Henry was abducted by aliens when he was thirteen and he has to choose whether or not the world is worth saving. He is having trouble making a decision when he meets Diego who makes Henry question who he is becoming. Can Henry save his own life along with everyone else’s?

LGBTQIA, YA Fiction

If I Was Your Girl by Meredith Russo

Grades 9-12
your-girl

Amanda is the new girl at her high school. As if being the new girl isn’t hard enough, she’s keeping a secret from her new classmates. In fact, that secret is the exact reason she transferred schools in the first place. She becomes close to Grant and starts to open up to him, but she fears that he will ultimately reject her when he finds out her secret: that she used to be Andrew.

ARC Reviews, LGBTQIA, Romance, YA Fiction

Jess, Chunk and the Road Trip to Infinity by Kristin Elizabeth Clark

Grades 9-12

jess chunk.jpg

Jess’s life has changed dramatically since the last time she saw her father; for one she was a boy named Jeremy. Now that she’s graduated from high school, she wants to try to make amends with her father who rejected her after she came out to him as trans. She believes that his wedding is the perfect place to do that. She starts out on a journey with her best friend Chunk to show up to her father’s wedding, which, she was fully invited to. Will her father come around? Or will it be a complete disaster?

Thanks to Netgalley.com for a review copy of this book.

Award/Honor Books, LGBTQIA, Tear Jerkers, YA Fiction

Love Is the Higher Law by David Levithan

Grades 9-12david

Chances are, if you were born in 1994 or later, you remember the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center. I know I do. I was 12 years old and in 7th grade- ugh, middle school. Possibly the worst time in my life. I mean, how many people have fond memories of middle school? Even so, I won’t ever forget that day. There was a message on the loudspeaker for teachers to check their emails. Then the entire 7th grade was ushered into the cafeteria and they explained to us what had happened. It was a blur after that. No one I knew worked in the city, but my classmates had parents and relatives that worked there.

David Levithan’s book, which was published in 2009, follows three teens, Claire, Jasper and Peter, as they experience the same thing I did back in 2001 on the nation’s second day of infamy. Claire and Peter are classmates; both high school juniors. Jasper is a college sophomore. Yet each teen is drawn to the other as a result of the catastrophic event. They become good friends as they lean on each other and try to wrap their heads around what happened on that fateful day.

LGBTQIA, YA Fiction

None of the Above by I.W. Gregorio

none of the aboveGrades 9-12

Kristin Lattimer is your average teenage girl: she has good friends, a boyfriend and a loving father who supports her. Then a visit to the doctor changes her life forever. She finds out she is intersex, which means that she has male chromosomes, and male “parts,” but still looks like a girl on the outside. Kristin wonders if she really is a girl. Is she a boy? Or none of the above?