NetGalley Reviews, Nonfiction, Self Help

101 Things All Young Adults Should Know by John Hawkins

Grades 9-12

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This book has 101 chapters that give young adults advice about how to get the most out of life. Hawkins uses his life experience to help kids in their late teens to early 20s live their best life, and hopefully learn from some of his mistakes. A highly recommended book for all young adults!

Thanks to Netgalley.com for a review copy of this book.

Nonfiction, Self Help

Girling Up: How to Be Strong, Smart and Spectactular by Mayim Bialik

Grades 6-12

girling up

Mayim Bialik is best known for playing Amy Farrah Fowler on The Big Bang Theory. Some may know, though, that she has a Ph.D. in neuroscience. She puts that knowledge to good use in this book for teens and young girls. She discusses things that all girls go through in their lives, and what they deal with on a daily basis, such as friends, family and school. Using scientific facts and stories from her own life, Bialik explains the biological, psychological and sociological aspects of growing up a girl, or as she says, “girling up.”

Thanks to the publisher for a review copy of this book.

Memoirs, Nonfiction

Born With Teeth by Kate Mulgrew

Ages 18+

born with teeth

Kate Mulgrew grew up in an Irish Catholic family in a small mid-western town, and always wanted of becoming an actress. However, her family’s unconventional way of life made it hard to pursue her dream. At 18, she left home and headed to New York, where she studied acting with the legendary Stella Adler. Then, at 22, she became pregnant and gave up her daughter for adoption, a hard decision to say the least. Known for playing roles of strong women like “Red” on Orange Is the New Black, Mulgrew writes about her perseverance to gain what she yearned for all her life.

Nonfiction

The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot

Ages 18+

henrietta lacksWhen Rebecca Skloot first learned about Henrietta Lacks, she was determined to research all she could about her life and the science advances that her cells made possible. Henrietta Lacks was a poor southern tobacco farmer in the 1950s whose cervical cancer cells were taken and studied without her knowledge. Known as HeLa, the cells took a vital part in discovering the Polio vaccine, unknown information about cancer, cloning, and in vitro fertilization. HeLa is known to today’s scientists worldwide, and continues to grow. However, Henrietta Lacks’ children and grandchildren have seen no profits from this and feel violated. A combination of research and interviews with Henrietta’s family members, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks is a gripping read.